This is a guest contribution by the leader of an emerging political party created around the ideal of direct democracy. You can visit the Facebook page of the New Parliament Party clicking here.

A new era in British politics has been ushered in after the leave campaign victory. The referendum result was followed swiftly by the resignation or removal not only of Cameron, whose incumbency met its end with his failure to convince the British people of the merits of the European course, but also of several other key proponents either side of the battlefield, notable examples include Osborne, Gove and Farage, while the much berated leader of the opposition Jeremy Corbyn currently clings to power by the slimmest of threads. But beyond this merry-go-round of political representation, what truly struck many observers when the people streamed to the polls was the particular way in which the electorate by and large no longer adhered to party colours.

Indeed, the parties themselves were unable to create a coherent and united direction for their supporters to follow, with both traditional conservative and labour wings finding common ground in rejecting Brussels, while the centrists of this English political dichotomy found concordance in seeking to maintain the European status quo. These unusual patterns of cross party collaboration also appear to signal some ideological disorientation especially on behalf of those who confess to leftist adherence. The roots of such a shift are to be found in the rebranding of the Labour party under the guidance of Tony Blair, it’s a shift that contributed overwhelmingly to the rise of the right, by infiltrating the Labour party with Blairites the traditional left has become increasingly isolated with the general public seemingly unaware of the gradual slide to the right. Brexit underscored perhaps more succinctly than any previous political contest the manner in which the goal posts have been moved, with three out of the four predominate conservative and Labour wings promoting above all the interests of big business and a clearly defined withering away of the state. Many “progressives” would concur with this view of a massive swing to the right, for them however evidence thereof is embodied precisely in the victory of the leave campaign, a campaign that was accused of pushing an anti-immigration agenda on behalf of a xenophobic, anti-Semitic and basically intolerant little Britain mindset. British sovereignty that clearly played a more fundamental role according to research released in the aftermath of the nation’s decision is all but dismissed by those who ironically have become extremely obdurate to both the Brexit result and those who advocated the leave line. Interestingly this liberal or rather left liberal intolerance to Brexit, its followers and direct democracy has proven far from being the only cognizant act of hypocrisy or inconsistency on the part of the remain campaigners of a leftist persuasion. In fact it is fundamentally this supposed left that without strategy or rationale plummeted to support the biggest capitalist project that the earth hitherto has witnessed and in doing so was effectively nothing more than an unassuming ally of the right. Naturally the propaganda machines were certainly well oiled on both sides of the Brexit parapet, but the notion that the European Union was sold to what we must presume to be ideologically challenged liberals who without any foresight simply bought into this idea that the European Union represented a social democratic movement that afforded the British citizenry protection from the ravages of the neoliberal, pro austerity Conservative party is reflective of the power with which the mainstream was able to influence the self-proclaimed “intellectual vote” .Where precisely this Great British intelligentsia found a solution to the domestic ills of their conservative party in the undemocratic, pro austerity and neoliberal nature of this regional behemoth is unfathomable. Indeed, at which point since 1975 had the EU intervened to deny the British conservative party from introducing any policy they deemed fit for our nation? That the British have a renowned propensity or inability to see beyond their borders sadly meant they were unable to take into consideration that it was the EU who had thrust an incredible series of ongoing austerity cuts upon the Greeks, Italians, Spaniards and the Portuguese. When highlighting the EU economic dictates upon their fellow member states with clear contravention of any notion of democracy a friend quipped: “I’m not interested in what s happening abroad, I’m interested in only what’s happening here” sounding in the process incredibly similar to those little Englanders who he so vehemently opposed. That the power of the right in modern Britain is clearly in the ascendency is given further credence when realising that the UK referendum was primarily a contest between to wings of the conservative party. That the true left miserably failed in seeking to interject into this right wing dominated debate by promoting the socialist argument for leave in the form of their “Lexit” campaign is a testament to the asymmetrical division of political power within our land. Of particular disappointment was the manner in which “Lexit” failed to deliver its message that both the Treaty of the foundation of the European Union and the Treaty of the EU equate to the legal protection of turbo capitalism with no democratic recourse. It seems incredulous that those who profess a hatred for Thatcher and proclaim to stand for a socialist future could so confidently disregard the legal basis on which the EU has wholeheartedly embraced market liberalism and public welfare cuts . An inability to rationalise such blatant economic policy suggests that the liberal fraction of the remain campaign were held so obsessively captive by their own view of what the leave campaign represented (namely anti migration) that they were unable to digest any kind of logical fact based argument. The ease and irresponsible manner with which they also promoted social tensions by playing what was in reality nothing more than an inverted race card in an attempt to discredit their opponents, had probably more to do with the unease felt by foreigners all across the UK then any arguments presented by the leave campaign. The reluctancy to accept the referendum result, with renewed calls for a second referendum, or the dismissal of the concept of direct democracy are there to show the so called liberals are in reality terrible, awful losers.

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